Zest! A space for young adults

Zest 101

If you're a first time visitor, welcome! If you're a regular Zest reader or contributor, welcome back. Here's a quick snapshot of Zest.

Zest is an online space for people around the ages of 18 to 35 who live with blindness or low vision. Whether it’s talking about dating, socializing, travelling, your studies, working or simply useful things to do when you are chilling in your own time, we want this to be the place where you can ask questions and interact with others who have similar experiences to yourself. Zest is your community, and we hope you introduce yourself and share. Don’t be shy.


Quick Links

Note: some links will display a new page, others will update sections further down this page.
Sign Up Log in Guest Book and Introductions Forums News Feed Useful Links


Check out our audio guide on navigating Zest or our tips on navigating Zest with a screenreader

The Zest team welcomes suggestions and ideas to improve the site. To contact us or make a suggestion simply email: zest@visionaustralia.org


While we try to ensure the Zest pages have accurate information and resources, Zest is a place for people to share personal experiences and solutions. The information on these pages is not meant to be a substitute for professional assistance or advice.

Zest 101

If you're a first time visitor, welcome! If you're a regular Zest reader or contributor, welcome back. Here's a quick snapshot of Zest.

Zest is an online space for people around the ages of 18 to 35 who live with blindness or low vision. Whether it’s talking about dating, socializing, travelling, your studies, working or simply useful things to do when you are chilling in your own time, we want this to be the place where you can ask questions and interact with others who have similar experiences to yourself. Zest is your community, and we hope you introduce yourself and share. Don’t be shy.


Quick Links

Note: some links will display a new page, others will update sections further down this page.
Sign Up Log in Guest Book and Introductions Forums News Feed Useful Links


Check out our audio guide on navigating Zest or our tips on navigating Zest with a screenreader

The Zest team welcomes suggestions and ideas to improve the site. To contact us or make a suggestion simply email: zest@visionaustralia.org


While we try to ensure the Zest pages have accurate information and resources, Zest is a place for people to share personal experiences and solutions. The information on these pages is not meant to be a substitute for professional assistance or advice.

Discussions: All (31) Open (31)
  • You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    I had a demonstration with the new Orcam my eye 2.0 yesterday and thought I’d share. I had seen the last one which was good but required a device to be carried in the pocket at all times in order to use it. This version doesn't need that.


    Specs

    ·  About the length and thickness of an index finger in total size

    ·  Similar to a USB stick or a cigarette lighter in weight

    ·  Recharges via mini USB in about 30 minutes for full charge

    ·  Battery life of 2 hours in  full time use mode

    ·  Can magnetically attach to the arm of glasses or be attached to a lanyard around your neck for intermittent hand held use

    ·  Controlled by hand gestures in front of the camera or by tapping small touch pad on the side of the device

    ·  Connects to Bluetooth headphones should you wish

    ·  Responds to voice commands

    ·  Wi-Fi connectivity


    Features

    ·  Product barcode recognition and ability to add new barcodes to database

    ·  reads print documents

    ·  Reads Australian currency

    ·  tels time with hand gesture that mimics looking at a watch

    ·  store and name images and speak aloud when seen again I.E people, bus numbers, shop fronts etc.


    Definitely something people would use their assistive technology budget in your NDIS plan for as it retails for about 7 grand including training on the device. However it does do in one device what many other devices will only do individually.

    Contact Quantum to find out more and ask questions of those who make it. Also see the video link below to see it demonstrated on 7 Sunrise

    Orcam my eye 2.0 on Quantum


    Orcam my eye 2.0 demo on 7 sunrise




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    HumanWare just brought out the new Victor Reader Trek device. I got a demonstration of it in the office last week and thought i'd share.


    The Trek is the same size as the old style reader and includes the functions of book reading and GPS.

    Of the many things it can do my favourite is course plotting.


    The device works off Tom Tom maps and Tom Tom have mapped the inside of major shopping centres for the Trek. This also means that you can plot your own turn by turn course inside a building or in an open space and the device will remember it. This is useful for walking in parks for example where the main stream maps  aren't that detailed. You can also buy additional maps for different places around the world if you are traveling. Please see the following link for more information and specs:

    Victor Reader Trek by HumanWare





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  • Introduce

    by sylsius, almost 2 years ago

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    your web browsing experience with accessible products can be vastly different depending on the web browser you are using. It's for that reason that I always have three on my laptop and work computer at any given time. unfortunately many websites unless they actively embed accessibility into their code can play havoc with things like Jaws, NVDA, voice over and Zoomtext. Microsoft edge has been quite a let down in the accessible area and explorer is quite an outdated program even though Jaws is made for windows products. I often find myself switching between firefox and chrome to do what I need to. Might be worth keeping in mind until there is better standardization around the world for digital  access.


    Are there any other browsers people use that they find make a big difference? Would be good to share.

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  • iTunes account related issue

    by teleworm, almost 2 years ago

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    I have an issue when I access the iTunes account on my iPhone and the same account I want to use an Apple Smart TV then its shows an error that is error 4013 and I don't know how to get them on my Apple TV. Have any idea then please suggest here.

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    I found this interesting article about  the current trials with driver-less cars as it relates to people who are blind or low vision. it's encouraging and kind of frustrating. Would you get behind the wheel of a driver-less car? I'd love too. I'd do anything to drive.
    Transforming the Autonomous Vehicle Experience for the Blind - Powering the New Engineer


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    Thought I'd share this. Jaguar have developed an electric car but they have gotten ahead of regulations and create an artificial sound system to alert pedestrians and those with vision conditions. click the link for the full article and a youtube clip where you can hear the concept. What do you think

    Jaguar I pace: The sounds of silence- article


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  • Online socialising

    by Lcowie, about 2 years ago

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    Hi

    I was wondering if anyone new of any other online socialising groups for young people. 

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    Has anyone heard about or used Soundscape App yet? I'd be curious to know.

    Soundscape is a free app developed by Microsoft for people who are blind or low vision. It is somewhat similar to Blindsquare but instead of clock directions to pointout landmarks you hear the direction of the landmark  through headphones. You can also plot your own locations and becons and name them so you aren't just relying on information already entered into the map about your local area. It is my understanding that a lot of people are using it with bone conducting headphones like aftershocks to ensure it doesn't  create issues to hearing traffic and the like. Would be most interested to hear people's experiences if you have used it. if it is good, if it is bad etc.

    Soundscape! a map delivered in 3d sound- YouTube




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  • Share Your Anecdotes!

    by Foxy, about 2 years ago

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    We've all got them - stories about someone doing or saying something profoundly stupid, or times when you've put your elbow in the butter ... perhaps literally. Everyone needs a good chuckle from time to time.

    I'll start. When I was young, my mother got a babysitter for my sister and I from 3-5pm so she could still work. This babysitter, Karen, had an outrageous American accent, wore aviators indoors, and seemed there mostly to lord it over me.

    Sometimes Karen would ask me where my sister was, and I would respond that I thought she was outside, I'll go check. Moments later I found my sister outside, and out of breath. Heading back inside, I would find Karen again, also mysteriously out of breath.

    My trusting (oblivious) nature meant it took several weeks of Karen bossing me around, and the two of them never being in the same room for me to realize what was going on.

    The fake accent really should have tipped me off. I figured it out eventually, and when I did I think I was just happy to be included in something, so I let the farce continue for a good 6 months or so before my mother found out and put a stop to it.

    Still, it makes for an interesting story.

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